American Lit B MIDTERM

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1.
2 points
Read this selection from a story. Then, answer the questions that follow.

Soon after they left Chicago, the land grew flat as a pancake. The suburbs faded away, and they passed cornfield after cornfield. "We could buy an old farm and move out here," Jonathan told her. "It would be a nice, peaceful place for you to write."

Deb stared at the passing landscape. She remembered the same flat land from her own childhood in Colorado. Her father had loved ranch life. She remembered how he used to sing as he worked in the fields.

Yes, this part of Illinois had the same look. Didn't Abe Lincoln grow up around here? Was it here that he had made his long walks to school? She remembered waiting for the school bus back in Colorado. The land was so flat you could see the bus for miles. She turned to Jonathan. "Of
course we can live here, darling. It would be a lovely change."

Which of these events in the selection came first?
2.
1 point
Where does the semicolon go in the following sentence?

Juanita says she adores Indian food actually she has never tried any.
3.
2 points
Read the selection. Then, answer the questions that follow.

Eldorado was an imaginary place abounding in gold, thought
by sixteenth-century Spaniards to exist in America.

Gaily bedight,
A gallant knight,
In sunshine and in shadow,
Had journey long,
Singing a song,
In search of Eldorado.
But he grew old,
This knight so bold,
And o'er his heart a shadow
Fell as he found
No spot of ground
That looked like Eldorado.

from "Eldorado" by Edgar Allan Poe

Which of these is a feature of free verse in poetry?o
4.
1 point
The United States fought in two World Wars during the Modern Age. America entered World War I in 1917 and the war ended in 1919. America then entered WWII in 1941. How many years of peace were there in between??
5.
1 point
The sentence below is an example of which of the following?

He that lies down with Dogs, shall rise up with fleas.
6.
2 points
Read the following sentence. Then, use the sentence to answer the questions that follow.

If you want a representative who is one of you, who knows your hopes and dreams, who will help you fight oppression, vote for me.

What is the purpose of this sentence?
7.
1 point
Is Grammar Important?
By: Carole Jenkins

(1) Do you moan and groan whenever a teacher says that you need to improve your grammar? (2) Do you take offense when someone tells you that you made a mistake in grammar? (3) Do you feel that studying and learning grammar is boring and unnecessary? (4) I hated studying grammar when I was in school.

(5) English is a very tricky language loaded with many rules and just as many exceptions to those rules. (6)By knowing these rules and exceptions, you'll be a better reader, writer, listener,
and speaker. (7)Communicating with others is what it's all about.

(8) Organizing a sentence so that it gets across your intended meaning is important. (9) In order to do this, you have to know the parts of a sentence (subject, predicate, phrase, clause, etc.) and the parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective, etc.) (10) Knowing the elements of a sentence and how sentences are structured can help you to get across your intended meanings in your writing and speaking. (11) You will also understand others as you read and listen.

(12) Knowledge and understanding of English grammar can help you to see patterns of different languages and dialects as you read and study literature. (13) Learning a foreign language, such as French or Spanish, is based on your mastery of the basic rules of English grammar. (14)
Understanding the tenses of verbs, subject-verb agreement, sentence structure, and parts of speech form the foundation for learning new languages.

(15) As you read and study assignments in all of your classes, knowing basic grammar can help you to comprehend the text. (16) When you come across a difficult passage, analyzing the sentence structure can often help you to figure out the meaning of difficult sentences. (17) This
can lead to an analysis and understanding of an author's writing style and can, in turn, lead to comprehension of the text.

(18) You are probably wondering how all of the rules and their exceptions will be remembered by you. (19) Don't worry! (20) There are many grammar guides and style manuals available to help you. (21) These are quick references that can be consulted as the need arises. (22) Even your English teacher who has been teaching for thirty years relies on a reference book now and then!

(23) Have I convinced you that the study of grammar is important and well worth your effort? (24) I hope so!

In sentence 10 the words knowing, writing, and speaking are all examples of
8.
2 points
Is Grammar Important?
By: Carole Jenkins

(1) Do you moan and groan whenever a teacher says that you need to improve your grammar? (2) Do you take offense when someone tells you that you made a mistake in grammar? (3) Do you feel that studying and learning grammar is boring and unnecessary? (4) I hated studying grammar when I was in school.

(5) English is a very tricky language loaded with many rules and just as many exceptions to those rules. (6)By knowing these rules and exceptions, you'll be a better reader, writer, listener,
and speaker. (7)Communicating with others is what it's all about.

(8) Organizing a sentence so that it gets across your intended meaning is important. (9) In order to do this, you have to know the parts of a sentence (subject, predicate, phrase, clause, etc.) and the parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective, etc.) (10) Knowing the elements of a sentence and how sentences are structured can help you to get across your intended meanings in your writing and speaking. (11) You will also understand others as you read and listen.

(12) Knowledge and understanding of English grammar can help you to see patterns of different languages and dialects as you read and study literature. (13) Learning a foreign language, such as French or Spanish, is based on your mastery of the basic rules of English grammar. (14)
Understanding the tenses of verbs, subject-verb agreement, sentence structure, and parts of speech form the foundation for learning new languages.

(15) As you read and study assignments in all of your classes, knowing basic grammar can help you to comprehend the text. (16) When you come across a difficult passage, analyzing the sentence structure can often help you to figure out the meaning of difficult sentences. (17) This
can lead to an analysis and understanding of an author's writing style and can, in turn, lead to comprehension of the text.

(18) You are probably wondering how all of the rules and their exceptions will be remembered by you. (19) Don't worry! (20) There are many grammar guides and style manuals available to help you. (21) These are quick references that can be consulted as the need arises. (22) Even your English teacher who has been teaching for thirty years relies on a reference book now and then!

(23) Have I convinced you that the study of grammar is important and well worth your effort? (24) I hope so!

What transition could be added to the beginning of Sentence (7)?
9.
2 points
Read this selection from a story. Then, answer the questions that follow.

Soon after they left Chicago, the land grew flat as a pancake. The suburbs faded away, and they passed cornfield after cornfield. "We could buy an old farm and move out here," Jonathan told her. "It would be a nice, peaceful place for you to write."

Deb stared at the passing landscape. She remembered the same flat land from her own childhood in Colorado. Her father had loved ranch life. She remembered how he used to sing as he worked in the fields.

Yes, this part of Illinois had the same look. Didn't Abe Lincoln grow up around here? Was it here that he had made his long walks to school? She remembered waiting for the school bus back in Colorado. The land was so flat you could see the bus for miles. She turned to Jonathan. "Of
course we can live here, darling. It would be a lovely change."

Which detail is ambiguous in this portion of the selection?
10.
1 point
In which of the following pairs is a long sentence followed by a shorter sentence that emphasizes the material in the first sentence?
11.
1 point
Which choice below presents the core meaning of the following sentence from "The Fall of the House of Usher"?

One of the phantasmagoric conceptions of my friend, partaking not so rigidly of the spirit of abstraction, may be shadowed forth, although feebly, in words.
12.
2 points
Consider the following excerpt from "When You Have a Sore Throat" and answer the questions that follow.

Antibiotics usually are prescribed only for patients who might have "strep throat," an infection caused by a bacterium called Streptococcus. A patient with strep throat might have a sore throat with fever that starts suddenly, without a cough or cold symptoms. Strep throat is very
common in children from 5 to 12 years of age. The exam might show a red throat, with pus on the tonsils and swollen neck glands. If you have these signs, the doctor may do other tests to see if you need an antibiotic.

Why might strep throat be common among the age group mentioned?
13.
2 points
Read the selection. Then, answer the questions that follow.

Eldorado was an imaginary place abounding in gold, thought
by sixteenth-century Spaniards to exist in America.

Gaily bedight,
A gallant knight,
In sunshine and in shadow,
Had journey long,
Singing a song,
In search of Eldorado.
But he grew old,
This knight so bold,
And o'er his heart a shadow
Fell as he found
No spot of ground
That looked like Eldorado.

from "Eldorado" by Edgar Allan Poe

What idea do the images in the poem's second stanza convey?
14.
2 points
Read the selection. Then, answer the questions that follow.

Eldorado was an imaginary place abounding in gold, thought
by sixteenth-century Spaniards to exist in America.

Gaily bedight,
A gallant knight,
In sunshine and in shadow,
Had journey long,
Singing a song,
In search of Eldorado.
But he grew old,
This knight so bold,
And o'er his heart a shadow
Fell as he found
No spot of ground
That looked like Eldorado.

from "Eldorado" by Edgar Allan Poe

Which line of poetry is characteristic of transcendentalism?
15.
1 point
Which of these lines most contributes the eerie, hypnotic single effect of "The Raven"?
16.
1 point
Is Grammar Important?
By: Carole Jenkins

(1) Do you moan and groan whenever a teacher says that you need to improve your grammar? (2) Do you take offense when someone tells you that you made a mistake in grammar? (3) Do you feel that studying and learning grammar is boring and unnecessary? (4) I hated studying grammar when I was in school.

(5) English is a very tricky language loaded with many rules and just as many exceptions to those rules. (6)By knowing these rules and exceptions, you'll be a better reader, writer, listener,
and speaker. (7)Communicating with others is what it's all about.

(8) Organizing a sentence so that it gets across your intended meaning is important. (9) In order to do this, you have to know the parts of a sentence (subject, predicate, phrase, clause, etc.) and the parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective, etc.) (10) Knowing the elements of a sentence and how sentences are structured can help you to get across your intended meanings in your writing and speaking. (11) You will also understand others as you read and listen.

(12) Knowledge and understanding of English grammar can help you to see patterns of different languages and dialects as you read and study literature. (13) Learning a foreign language, such as French or Spanish, is based on your mastery of the basic rules of English grammar. (14)
Understanding the tenses of verbs, subject-verb agreement, sentence structure, and parts of speech form the foundation for learning new languages.

(15) As you read and study assignments in all of your classes, knowing basic grammar can help you to comprehend the text. (16) When you come across a difficult passage, analyzing the sentence structure can often help you to figure out the meaning of difficult sentences. (17) This
can lead to an analysis and understanding of an author's writing style and can, in turn, lead to comprehension of the text.

(18) You are probably wondering how all of the rules and their exceptions will be remembered by you. (19) Don't worry! (20) There are many grammar guides and style manuals available to help you. (21) These are quick references that can be consulted as the need arises. (22) Even your English teacher who has been teaching for thirty years relies on a reference book now and then!

(23) Have I convinced you that the study of grammar is important and well worth your effort? (24) I hope so!

Which phrase from the passage is an example of INFORMAL language?
17.
1 point
What type of persuasive appeals does the following sentence illustrate?

Statistics, such as the fact that the average child or teenager watches nearly three hours of television a day, show that it is important to monitor the effects of television-watching on
children.
18.
1 point
This term is considered to be a great exaggeration. It is the BEST LITERARY TERM EVER!
19.
1 point
Which of the following pronouns correctly replaces Lakeisha in the sentence below?

The argument over the granola bar was the first fight I had ever seen between Sarita and Lakeisha.
20.
2 points
Read the following sentence. Then, use the sentence to answer the questions that follow.

If you want a representative who is one of you, who knows your hopes and dreams, who will help you fight oppression, vote for me.

Which word from the sentence is a charged word?
21.
2 points
Read the selection. Then, answer the questions that follow.

Eldorado was an imaginary place abounding in gold, thought
by sixteenth-century Spaniards to exist in America.

Gaily bedight,
A gallant knight,
In sunshine and in shadow,
Had journey long,
Singing a song,
In search of Eldorado.
But he grew old,
This knight so bold,
And o'er his heart a shadow
Fell as he found
No spot of ground
That looked like Eldorado.

from "Eldorado" by Edgar Allan Poe

What does Eldorado most likely symbolize in the poem?
22.
2 points
Is Grammar Important?
By: Carole Jenkins

(1) Do you moan and groan whenever a teacher says that you need to improve your grammar? (2) Do you take offense when someone tells you that you made a mistake in grammar? (3) Do you feel that studying and learning grammar is boring and unnecessary? (4) I hated studying grammar when I was in school.

(5) English is a very tricky language loaded with many rules and just as many exceptions to those rules. (6)By knowing these rules and exceptions, you'll be a better reader, writer, listener,
and speaker. (7)Communicating with others is what it's all about.

(8) Organizing a sentence so that it gets across your intended meaning is important. (9) In order to do this, you have to know the parts of a sentence (subject, predicate, phrase, clause, etc.) and the parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective, etc.) (10) Knowing the elements of a sentence and how sentences are structured can help you to get across your intended meanings in your writing and speaking. (11) You will also understand others as you read and listen.

(12) Knowledge and understanding of English grammar can help you to see patterns of different languages and dialects as you read and study literature. (13) Learning a foreign language, such as French or Spanish, is based on your mastery of the basic rules of English grammar. (14)
Understanding the tenses of verbs, subject-verb agreement, sentence structure, and parts of speech form the foundation for learning new languages.

(15) As you read and study assignments in all of your classes, knowing basic grammar can help you to comprehend the text. (16) When you come across a difficult passage, analyzing the sentence structure can often help you to figure out the meaning of difficult sentences. (17) This
can lead to an analysis and understanding of an author's writing style and can, in turn, lead to comprehension of the text.

(18) You are probably wondering how all of the rules and their exceptions will be remembered by you. (19) Don't worry! (20) There are many grammar guides and style manuals available to help you. (21) These are quick references that can be consulted as the need arises. (22) Even your English teacher who has been teaching for thirty years relies on a reference book now and then!

(23) Have I convinced you that the study of grammar is important and well worth your effort? (24) I hope so!

What transition could be added to Sentence (14)?
23.
1 point
On the Georgia High School Graduation Writing Test when you are asked to "choose a side" which type of essay are you being asked to write?
24.
2 points
Hard Times
By: Charles Dickens

1 'NOW, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir!'

2 The scene was a plain, bare, monotonous vault of a school-room, and the speaker's square forefinger emphasized his observations by underscoring every sentence with a line on the schoolmaster's sleeve. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's square wall of a forehead, which had his eyebrows for its base, while his eyes found commodious cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside. The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders,-nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was,-all helped the emphasis.

3 'In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!'

4 The speaker, and the schoolmaster, and the third grown person present, all backed a little, and swept with their eyes the inclined plane of little vessels then and there arranged in order, ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim.

What metaphor does the author use to describe the speaker's forehead and eyes?
25.
2 points
Read the selection. Then, answer the questions that follow.

Eldorado was an imaginary place abounding in gold, thought
by sixteenth-century Spaniards to exist in America.

Gaily bedight,
A gallant knight,
In sunshine and in shadow,
Had journey long,
Singing a song,
In search of Eldorado.
But he grew old,
This knight so bold,
And o'er his heart a shadow
Fell as he found
No spot of ground
That looked like Eldorado.

from "Eldorado" by Edgar Allan Poe

Which of these does shadow most likely symbolize in the first stanza of the poem?
26.
1 point
Which word best replaces chastise in this sentence:

"The parent tried not to chastise her teenage daughter in front of her neighbors"?
27.
1 point
Is Grammar Important?
By: Carole Jenkins

(1) Do you moan and groan whenever a teacher says that you need to improve your grammar? (2) Do you take offense when someone tells you that you made a mistake in grammar? (3) Do you feel that studying and learning grammar is boring and unnecessary? (4) I hated studying grammar when I was in school.

(5) English is a very tricky language loaded with many rules and just as many exceptions to those rules. (6)By knowing these rules and exceptions, you'll be a better reader, writer, listener,
and speaker. (7)Communicating with others is what it's all about.

(8) Organizing a sentence so that it gets across your intended meaning is important. (9) In order to do this, you have to know the parts of a sentence (subject, predicate, phrase, clause, etc.) and the parts of speech (noun, verb, adjective, etc.) (10) Knowing the elements of a sentence and how sentences are structured can help you to get across your intended meanings in your writing and speaking. (11) You will also understand others as you read and listen.

(12) Knowledge and understanding of English grammar can help you to see patterns of different languages and dialects as you read and study literature. (13) Learning a foreign language, such as French or Spanish, is based on your mastery of the basic rules of English grammar. (14)
Understanding the tenses of verbs, subject-verb agreement, sentence structure, and parts of speech form the foundation for learning new languages.

(15) As you read and study assignments in all of your classes, knowing basic grammar can help you to comprehend the text. (16) When you come across a difficult passage, analyzing the sentence structure can often help you to figure out the meaning of difficult sentences. (17) This
can lead to an analysis and understanding of an author's writing style and can, in turn, lead to comprehension of the text.

(18) You are probably wondering how all of the rules and their exceptions will be remembered by you. (19) Don't worry! (20) There are many grammar guides and style manuals available to help you. (21) These are quick references that can be consulted as the need arises. (22) Even your English teacher who has been teaching for thirty years relies on a reference book now and then!

(23) Have I convinced you that the study of grammar is important and well worth your effort? (24) I hope so!

Who is the intended audience for this passage?
28.
2 points
Consider the following excerpt from "When You Have a Sore Throat" and answer the questions that follow.

Antibiotics usually are prescribed only for patients who might have "strep throat," an infection caused by a bacterium called Streptococcus. A patient with strep throat might have a sore throat with fever that starts suddenly, without a cough or cold symptoms. Strep throat is very
common in children from 5 to 12 years of age. The exam might show a red throat, with pus on the tonsils and swollen neck glands. If you have these signs, the doctor may do other tests to see if you need an antibiotic.

What indicator(s) let the reader know that "strep throat' is the informal way to refer to the medical condition being discussed.
29.
1 point
What figure of speech does the following sentence contain?

The flower lifted its droopy head and drank eagerly.
30.
1 point
Which of the following speeches would require the most formal diction?l
31.
2 points
Read the selection. Then, answer the questions that follow.

Eldorado was an imaginary place abounding in gold, thought
by sixteenth-century Spaniards to exist in America.

Gaily bedight,
A gallant knight,
In sunshine and in shadow,
Had journey long,
Singing a song,
In search of Eldorado.
But he grew old,
This knight so bold,
And o'er his heart a shadow
Fell as he found
No spot of ground
That looked like Eldorado.

from "Eldorado" by Edgar Allan Poe

The journey in this poem is a symbol for life. Which of these best describes this type of symbol in literature?
32.
2 points
Hard Times
By: Charles Dickens

1 'NOW, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir!'

2 The scene was a plain, bare, monotonous vault of a school-room, and the speaker's square forefinger emphasized his observations by underscoring every sentence with a line on the schoolmaster's sleeve. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's square wall of a forehead, which had his eyebrows for its base, while his eyes found commodious cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside. The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders,-nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was,-all helped the emphasis.

3 'In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!'

4 The speaker, and the schoolmaster, and the third grown person present, all backed a little, and swept with their eyes the inclined plane of little vessels then and there arranged in order, ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim.


In this passage, what is the MOST LIKELY reason for capitalizing the word Fact?
33.
1 point
Which Transcendentalist belief is reflected in this passage from "Concord Hymn"?

Spirit, that made those heroes dare / To die, and leave their children free, / Bid Time and Nature gently spare / The shaft we raise to them and thee.
34.
1 point
Which of the following sentences correctly uses parallelism?
35.
2 points
Hard Times
By: Charles Dickens

1 'NOW, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir!'

2 The scene was a plain, bare, monotonous vault of a school-room, and the speaker's square forefinger emphasized his observations by underscoring every sentence with a line on the schoolmaster's sleeve. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's square wall of a forehead, which had his eyebrows for its base, while his eyes found commodious cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside. The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders,-nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was,-all helped the emphasis.

3 'In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!'

4 The speaker, and the schoolmaster, and the third grown person present, all backed a little, and swept with their eyes the inclined plane of little vessels then and there arranged in order, ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim.

Who or what is described as being "like a stubborn fact?"
36.
2 points
Hard Times
By: Charles Dickens

1 'NOW, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir!'

2 The scene was a plain, bare, monotonous vault of a school-room, and the speaker's square forefinger emphasized his observations by underscoring every sentence with a line on the schoolmaster's sleeve. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's square wall of a forehead, which had his eyebrows for its base, while his eyes found commodious cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside. The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders,-nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was,-all helped the emphasis.

3 'In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!'

4 The speaker, and the schoolmaster, and the third grown person present, all backed a little, and swept with their eyes the inclined plane of little vessels then and there arranged in order, ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim.

To what is the speaker's forehead compared?
37.
2 points
Read the following sentence. Then, use the sentence to answer the questions that follow.

If you want a representative who is one of you, who knows your hopes and dreams, who will help you fight oppression, vote for me.

If this sentence came from a speech, what would an appropriate audience be?
38.
2 points
Read this selection from a story. Then, answer the questions that follow.

Soon after they left Chicago, the land grew flat as a pancake. The suburbs faded away, and they passed cornfield after cornfield. "We could buy an old farm and move out here," Jonathan told her. "It would be a nice, peaceful place for you to write."

Deb stared at the passing landscape. She remembered the same flat land from her own childhood in Colorado. Her father had loved ranch life. She remembered how he used to sing as he worked in the fields.

Yes, this part of Illinois had the same look. Didn't Abe Lincoln grow up around here? Was it here that he had made his long walks to school? She remembered waiting for the school bus back in Colorado. The land was so flat you could see the bus for miles. She turned to Jonathan. "Of
course we can live here, darling. It would be a lovely change."

From the details provided, which of these predictions do you think is the most likely to occur later in the selection?
39.
1 point
Which form of the verb -shield- is used in the following sentence?

The boy sees the ball coming and shields himself with his left arm.
40.
1 point
Why is the following sentence ungrammatical?

The instructions were so confusing that she didn't have no idea what to do next.?